TPACK


The following plan is a part of a larger document available through a file sharing link.

Lesson Plan – Be Red Cross Ready

Stage 1 – Desired Results

Content Standard(s):

·                  Students will understand hazards in the area, mitigation and preparedness, and be able to create a preparedness kit and plan.

Unpacked Standard(s):

·                  Understand the terms hazard and preparedness.

·                  Understand mitigation.

·                  Be able to identify the resources most needed in an emergency or disaster.

·                  Be able to create a preparedness kit that will be effective in an emergency situation.

·                  Have an effective plan for emergencies.

·                  Feel prepared for potential hazard risks and therefore more comfortable.

Essential Questions:

·                  What kinds of emergencies can happen in my area?

·                  What are the best ways for me to be prepared for emergencies?

·                  What are the items I should have on-hand in case of emergency?

·                  What is the best way to create a preparedness plan?

·                  Does my preparedness kit fit my preparedness plan and would it be effective in an emergency?

Students will set their own personal goals by….

·         Identifying their own set of personal risks in an emergency situation.

·         Creating guidelines for their own emergency preparedness plan.

·         Being “Red Cross Ready” and able to create an effective emergency preparedness kit.

·         Identifying what steps to take and what resources to keep available in an emergency.

 

Progress on students' personalized goals will be monitored by…

·         In-class discussion and feedback during the one-hour presentation.

·         Post-hoc evaluation form.

Rules and Procedures

·         Respectful discussion: “No idea is a bad idea”

·         Maintenance of group discussion norms

·         Careful consideration of course material, it should not feel scary or imply that disaster is imminent.

 

 


 

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Directly Aligned to Content Standard

Pre-Assessment, including analysis of the pre-assessment results.



Performance Task(s) or Assignment Description(s):

  • Discuss and be able to recite hazards in the area
  • Participate in the discussion of “Red Cross Ready” preparedness kits
  • Be able to contribute idea about preparedness to the group discussion
  • Demonstrate readiness through the follow-up questionnaire.

 

Stage 3 – Learning Plan – Directly Aligned to Content Standard AND Assessments

Learning Activities:

Phase I: Introduction to Hazards and Mitigation: Lecture presentation using https://magic.piktochart.com/output/12069874-mitigation or the Disaster Cycle Presentation at https://docs.zoho.com/show/publish/qu3o10a5586c6e0f540b98befa91b45d33f1c or the "Types of Disasters" slideshow presentation at https://docs.zoho.com/file/1lhhy057bfc34756147a58955704e48219060 (Draft)

(15 Minutes)

Phase II: Disaster Preparedness: Handouts and discussion of “Red Cross Ready” preparedness kits and procedures. Discussion of useful items and skills in an emergency using http://stormboard.com

(20 Minutes)

Phase III: Group processing of disaster plans, and best practices, and where to find preparedness-related items. Demonstration of first-aid kits and items for sale on http://redcross.org (15 Minutes)

Phase IV: Feedback Worksheet and End of Class (See Stage 4).

Stage 4 Feedback Strategies, including Timeliness

Preparedness Post-Hoc Assessment: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B32eEzpVnqebQ2xxaktYdk9hSGM/view?usp=sharing

Scoring Sheet Template: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B32eEzpVnqebSTI2RExzazRPZEk/view



CERT Standard
Haddow, Bullock & Coppola (2011),"
Visual Fluency Tools
Present citizens with the facts about what to expect following a major disaster in terms of immediate services.
http://www.redcross.org
http://www.flickr.com
Give the message about their responsibility for mitigation and preparedness. At-a-glance resources
http://www.piktochart.com

Example: 
https://magic.piktochart.com/output/12069874-mitigation
Train (citizens) in needed lifesaving skills with an emphasis on decision-making skills, rescuer safety, and doing the greatest good for the greatest number. Interactive training and visual presentation (videos).
https://embarc-learning.sabacloud.com
http://www.stormboard.com
http://www.youtube.com
Organize teams so they are an extension of first-responder services, offering immediate help to victims until professional services arrive." (p. 111) Organize interactive peer-led discussions on social media.
https://www.facebook.com/redcross/
http://www.twitter.com
Establish community engagements to reduce social vulnerability in the community at large. Red Cross Training and Response Team Meetings, Photo Records of Preparedness Activity in the Community, Community Celebrations
http://classes.redcross.org
http://www.westword.com/event/the-red-cross-heroes-soiree-6895385
https://www.instagram.com/americanredcross/
Advocate for social responsibility and engagement as a part of disaster relief agencies and as a member of the community. Establish a salient identity as an American Red Cross Disaster Action Team Captain on social media.
https://www.facebook.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/model299

Crockett, L., Jukes, I. & Churches, A. (2011). Literacy is not enough: 21st-century fluencies for the digital age. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
Haddow, G., Bullock, J. & Coppola, D. (2011). Introduction to emergency management (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann. 


CERT Standard:
Haddow, Bullock & Coppola (2011),"
Adaptations for Fluency:
(Crockett, Jukes & Churches, 2011)
Technological Content Knowledge Integration Ideas:
Present citizens with the facts about what to expect following a major disaster in terms of immediate services.
Information Fluency: Ask, Acquire, Analyze, Apply, Assess.
An instructor-led collaborative exploration of American Red Cross training materials as well as an interactive exploration of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provided website http://www.ready.gov 
Give the message about their responsibility for mitigation and preparedness. Creative Fluency: Identify, Inspire, Interpolate, Imagine, Inspect.  While Presenting the American Red Cross training materials, it is possible to host a brainstorming session online while collaborating with a group of students on the main screen. This would only require instructor involvement and the wed based brainstorm chart at http://stormboard.com
Train (citizens) in needed lifesaving skills with an emphasis on decision-making skills, rescuer safety, and doing the greatest good for the greatest number. Solution Fluency: Define, Discover, Dream, Design, Deliver, Debrief.  The course materials offer a what's needed approach to preparedness, which asks students to learn additional skills through other training at The American Red Cross. A part of this activity is asking students what role they would like to have in terms of disaster preparedness and response, and allowing the students to design a future learning plan with other available Red Cross coursework.
Organize teams so they are an extension of first-responder services, offering immediate help to victims until professional services arrive." (p. 111) Media Fluency: Listening, Message, Medium; Leverage, Message, Medium.   The changing of the disaster cycle and the inclusion of new Incident Command System based interoperability standards asks for a part of the presentation to describe the disaster cycle using multimedia. This part of the presentation becomes then an interactive model of the disaster cycle that allows the instructor to interact with the class and describe the overall disaster model. 
Establish community engagements to reduce social vulnerability in the community at large. Collaboration Fluency: Establish, Envision, Engineer, Execute, Examine.  One of the differences between disaster response in the east and the west is the presence of community programs that engage people who have been affected by a disaster that reduce the impact of social vulnerability during the disaster. Preparedness students can work together to create and implement ideas which reduce social vulnerability both in the mitigation and preparedness phases as well. 
Advocate for social responsibility and engagement as a part of disaster relief agencies and as a member of the community. Global, Digital Citizenship Goals: Personal Responsibility, Global Citizenship, Digital Citizenship, Altruistic Service, Environmental Stewardship.  As a part of disaster preparedness training we can also ask students to become more engaged in the community as a part of the various programs that The American Red Cross offers. Becoming a more engaged and responsible part of the Red Cross is a part of reflecting the Global Citizenship goals, and by creating a call to action as a part of preparedness education we ask students to become more a part of the advocacy for resilient and prepared communities.

Crockett, L., Jukes, I. & Churches, A. (2011). Literacy is not enough: 21st-century fluencies for the digital age. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
Haddow, G., Bullock, J. & Coppola, D. (2011). Introduction to emergency management (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann. 



Common Core Standard

Colorado Department of Education (2010) outcomes expectations state (p. 20), “
How I Currently Teach It: Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Integration Ideas:
a. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. (CCSS: W.9-10.3): 

i. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. (CCSS: W.9- 10.3a) 

ii. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole. (CCSS: W.9- 10.3c)

Typically a structured presentation with a flat-file exhibit demonstrating the sections and formatting of correctly written academic literature. 

The exhibit is shown during lecture and each component of the written work is discussed such as the subject tense, and the beginning, middle, and end sections of the document. The discussion also focuses on the intended audience of the message.
The blended learning environment can be used to present a multimedia text, and students then break into work-groups and process a group-collaborative written evaluation of the text according to the structure given in the flat-file handout. 

http://capewest.ca/pbl.html
b. Write literary and narrative texts using a range of poetic techniques, figurative language, and graphic elements to engage or entertain the intended audience. The journal assignment is a series of weekly structured writing assignments written in Microsoft Word, that are graded with appropriate feedback. Students in work-groups can collaborate with a series of internet sources to produce a narrative multimedia work or presentation containing rich media elements according to fair-use policies and available online tools such as www.piktochart.com
d. Review and revise ideas and development in substantive ways to improve the depth of ideas and vividness of supporting details.  The instructor during the journal assignment visits previously submitted written assignments and using appropriate scaffolding the student creates new work based on constructive feedback from the instructor. Students in the larger Communities of Inquiry (Shea & Bidjerano, 2010) setting can evaluate a selected media text, during a brainstorming process, using online tools such as https://stormboard.com/
e. Explain strengths and weaknesses of own writing and the writing of others using criteria (e.g., checklists, scoring guides).”. The journal assignment is a self-evaluation assignment submitted according to instructor-established criteria. The student-created work is then evaluated during group process according to the criterion established in the rubrics for the course (Goodwin & Hubbell, 2013); students then establish the grade which they believe they had earned as a group.

CDE (2010). Colorado academic standards: Ninth grade reading, writing & communicating. Retrieved from: 
   https://www.cde.state.co.us/sites/default/files/documents/coreadingwriting/documents/rwc_9th_grade.pdf
Goodwin, B. & Hubbell, E. (2013). The 12 touchstones of good teaching: A checklist for staying focused every day. Denver, CO: McREL.





Personal Learning Environment:
Although the author maintains this list of bookmarks, there is a Personal Learning Environment that is regularly maintained as well as this list of the most-useful teaching tools in the table below.

Personal Learning Environment: http://www.symbaloo.com/home/mix/13eP27e9Ce

Internet Resource


Purpose

Rationale

Supportive Research

Integration Ideas

Teach, Learn, Lead

(http://www.teachlearnlead.org/)

Teacher social media and collaboration. Allows for the development of, discussion, and sharing of materials.

Shared experience and values develop social capital in the social context that empowers educators in the larger cultural context.

Loeb, P.R. Soul of a citizen: Living with conviction in challenging times. New York, NY: Back Bay.

The internet resource is a curated collection, created through collaboration by teachers, of useful technology integration resources.

Internet Motion Picture Database

(http://www.imdb.com/)

Reference for mainstream popular culture, music, movies, and video games. Useful for identifying relevant media texts for use in teaching modern culture, ethics, or English.

Mainstream culture influences the perception of students, and including relevant cultural texts in the learning space can enrich the learning experience through the discussion of social groups and values in the media texts.

Holtzman, L. Media messages: What film, television, and popular music teach us about race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. New York, NY: Routledge.

Bringing interaction to the classroom through the presentation of media texts and references to popular culture is mostly accomplished through some type of interactive blended learning presentation format. Technology integration is a required part of evaluating modern culture as the two are codependent.

Google Sites

(sites.google.com)

Development of internet and intranet shared resources. Google sites provides a platform for sharing and collaborating on internet materials, and incorporates a system for administrating user access credentials through Google+. The system can maintain public and private internet sites.

Maintaining a shared database of best practices and templates reduces some of the independent workload placed on instructors who would otherwise need to develop their own classroom materials. An intranet site can be made available to host shared course templates that can be modified by the entire team.

Dede, C., D. J. Ketelhut, Whitehouse, P. Briet, L.& McCloskey, E. M. (2009). A research agenda for online teacher professional development. Journal of Teacher Education, 60(1), 8-19.

Integrating shared resources with professional development allows for the asynchronous maintenance of peer-reviewed best-practices and course materials, which makes additional cognitive resources available for professional development time that would otherwise be used for developing materials.

Twitter.com

Social media platform for community interaction. Twitter can be used to maintain a social representation by an instructor which can help facilitate communication with the community and the integration of communally voiced needs in the classroom. Social media allows for two-way asynchronous communication that also maintains a shared social identity.

Maintaining positive social rapport with the community and also the adult classroom population facilitates the social and cognitive engagement demonstrated by the instructor which then facilitates the social and cognitive engagement of the learning groups. Social presence facilitates deep learning.

Shea, P. & Bidjerano, T. (2010). Learning presence: Towards a theory of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and the development of a communities of inquiry in online and blended learning environments. Computers & Education, 55, 1721-1731

Technology is primarily useful as a system for social and community engagement and collaboration. Integrating social media in the teaching workspace demonstrates a constructivist social identity that can then be attended to as a part of communities of inquiry learning.

Google Scholar

(Scholar.google.com)

A searchable database of peer-reviewed research.

Google Scholar often finds articles in databases that other searches may miss, but finding an article in Google Scholar allows a researcher to then go and access the specific journal cited through a subscription database such as those maintained by universities.

(Assumed Knowledge)

Mainstream education should always be backed by credible and current research. The current state of statistical data, having been renewed with calculations such as confidence intervals and effect sizes, indicates that a fair amount of assumed-to-be-true research may be repeated and arrive at alternate conclusions.

Fair-use rights may restrict the use of complete articles, but literature can be cited and used as a part of instructional materials developed by teachers who can then share those materials with other professionals using the other sites listed in this table.

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